The Impact of ICU-Acquired AKI

ICU-acquired Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) is a prevalent and serious problem, associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality. According to US physicians, among the top priorities for AKI is facilitating its prevention by earlier diagnosis.[1]  Preventive measures and identification of high-risk patients have shown a decrease in both the incidence and severity of hospital-acquired AKI.[2]

first
57%
of ICU patients
develop AKI3
Mortality rate
is increased
5-fold
in ICU patients
with AKI3
second
third
AKI increases
the length of
hospital stay by
3.5 days2
Sepsis is a leading risk
factor for AKI in the
ICU, occurring in over
40%
of cases3
four
hospital
Additional ICU costs
associated with AKI are
$15,0504

In a 2009 UK Study of Patients with Hospital-Acquired AKI, Diagnosed with Currently-Used Methods[5]:

icu-acquired-aki-43a

HAD AN
UNACCEPTABLE
DELAY IN DIAGNOSIS

icu-acquired-aki-54a

UNDERWENT
INADEQUATE RISK
ASSESSMENT

icu-acquired-aki-21a

OF THE CASES WERE
BOTH PREDICTABLE
AND AVOIDABLE,
ALL OF WHOM EXPIRED

[1] Decision Resources: TreatmentTrends: Acute Kidney Injury (US) 2015.

[2] Lewington AJP, Cerdá J, Mehta RL. Raising Awareness of Acute Kidney Injury. A Global Perspective of a Silent Killer.  Kidney Int. (2013) 84 (3):457-467.

[3] Hoste EAJ, Bagshaw SM, et. al. Epidemiology of acute kidney injury in critically ill patients: the multinational AKI-EPI study. Intensive Care Med (2015) 41:1411–1423.

[4] Halpern NA, Goldman DA, Tan KS, Pastores SM. Trends in Critical Care Beds and Use Among Population Groups and Medicare and Medicaid Beneficiaries in the United States: 2000­-2010. Crit Care Med (2016) 44(8):1490­-9.

[5] National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death. Adding Insult to Injury. 2009.